Eileen Hunt Botting on Shelley’s Frankenstein and AI in Aeon

After her essay on Wollstonecraft’s Vindication of the Rights of Woman last month, Eileen Hunt Botting is now discussing the lasting influence of Wollstonecraft’s daughter, Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein. In particular, she investigates how Frankenstein’s creature helps understand (and perhaps influences) how we think about Artificial Intellingence. This is part of Eileen’s new book project:  Political Science Fictions after Frankenstein: AI, GMOs, and the Politics of Making Artificial Life.

Read the article here.

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CFP: Dutch Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy

The Dutch Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy (DSEMP) is a great arena for presenting about women and other under-represented modern philosophers. In last year’s conference there were 5 papers on women out of 13. Let’s move this up a notch this year!

The Dutch Seminar in Early Modern Philosophy VI (DSEMP) will take place on 29–30 May 2019, at the Faculty of Philosophy, University of Groningen, Groningen, Netherlands.

The DSEMP brings together advanced students and established scholars to discuss the latest work in early modern philosophy, broadly conceived. Building on the success of the previous 2014–2018 editions, which gathered philosophers from all over the world, the Seminar offers workshop-style collaborations in order to stimulate scholarly exchange. The language of presentation and discussion is English.

Keynote speakers:
Katherine Brading (Duke University)
Marleen Rozemond (University of Toronto)

Submission guidelines: We welcome abstracts prepared for peer review on any topic related to early modern philosophy, broadly understood (roughly the period 1500–1800 CE). We are especially interested in presentations that discuss philosophical issues or works that have received less sustained scholarly attention, including, but not limited to: non-canonical authors and traditions, anonymous texts, and methodological reflections on doing Early Modern philosophy.
Please submit abstracts (400 words max.) to our EasyChair page (first time users will be asked to register with EasyChair).

Deadline for abstract submission: 10 January 2019 (11.59 pm – Amsterdam time).
Decisions will follow by the end of March. We will send reviewers’ reports with useful feedback on abstracts to all who wish to receive this.

Attendance is free and all are welcome, especially students. No financial assistance can be provided to support travel expenses and accommodation.

Contact: If you have questions, please send an email to Laura Georgescu (l.georgescu@rug.nl).

Co-organizers:
Laura Georgescu (University of Groningen)
Andrea Sangiacomo (University of Groningen)
The Dutch Seminar is part of the Activities of the Groningen Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Thought (www.rug.nl/gcmemt) and it is supported by Lodi Nauta’s Spinoza Prize Project.
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Philosopher Queens

Philosopher Queens, edited by Rebecca Buxton and Lisa Whiting, is a book aimed at a general audience about women philosophers throughout history, written by women in philosophy. It will bring to wider attention in an entertaining and accessible way a range of women philosophers from Hypatia and Mary Astell through to Hannah Arendt and Anita L. Allen. It’s currently being crowdfunded through Unbound press, who have published books such as Letters of Note and The Good Immigrant.

Watch the promotional video.

Chapters and contributors so far include:

Hypatia by Lisa Whiting
Lalleshwari by Shalini Sinha
Anne Conway by Julia Bocherding
Mary Astell by Simone Webb
Mary Wollstonecraft by Sandrine Bergès
Harriet Taylor Mill by Helen McCabe
Christine Ladd-Franklin by Sara Uckelman
Mary Anne Evans by Clare Carlisle
Edith Stein by Jae Hetterley
Hannah Arendt by Rebecca Buxton
Simone de Beauvoir by Kate Kirkpatrick
Iris Murdoch by Fay Niker
Elizabeth Anscombe by Hannah Carnegy-Arbuthnott
Mary Warnock by Gulzaar Barn
Iris Marion Young by Desiree Lim
Anita L Allen by Ilhan Dahir
Azizah Y. al-Hibri by Nima Dahir

If you want to help, please pledge here.

 

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Journal of Modern Philosophy

Good news: a new open access, free journal in the history of philosophy is accepting submissions:

The Journal of Modern Philosophy is now soliciting submissions in the history of philosophy from the 16th century to the 18th century up to, but not including, Kant. It is the goal of this journal to meet a clear need for a specialist journal in the history of modern philosophy. We welcome all papers that fall within the general category of modern philosophy, but we are especially eager to receive papers on under-represented figures and topics. We plan to expand to Kant and the nineteenth century in the future, and will at present consider submissions on underrepresented topics and authors in the nineteenth century. We also welcome reviewers who wish to be enrolled with the journal.JMPhil is Open Access, authors will maintain their copyright, and submissions will be published on a rolling basis. All submissions will be double anonymously refereed, with a target turnaround time of ten weeks.

For more information or to submit a paper, go to jmphil.org

This journal was started by Aaron Garrett and Antonia LoLordo in response to the dearth of journals publishing about women and minorities in the history of philosophy. If you want to help increase diversity in history of philosophy, join up and become a reviewer!

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Karen Green on Locke and the Ladies at Paderborn

On 23 – 26 October 2018, Prof. Karen Green (University of Melbourne) will be offering a Master Class titled Locke and the Ladies. On 18th Century Female Republicans in England, at the Center for the History of Women Philosophers and Scientists, Paderborn University.
Those interested in attending should send (in a single file) a copy of their CV along with a short letter of introduction describing their area of research and why they are interested in this course to contact@historyofwomenphilosophers.orgno later than 12 October, 2018.

Attendees will be responsible for organizing their own travel and accommodations.

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Annual BSHP lecture by Sarah Hutton on Women Philosophers

The British Society for the History of Philosophy (BSHP) is happy to announce that the BSHP Annual Lecture will be given by SARAH HUTTON, honorary visiting professor at the University of York, and the distinguished author of a substantial body of work on early modern philosophy, including “Anne Conway, a Woman Philosopher” (Cambridge, 2004) and, recently, “British Philosophy in the Seventeenth-Century” (Oxford, 2015).

She will speak on the topic: “Women, Philosophy and the History of Philosophy”

The event takes place at the Maison Française d’Oxford (MFO), 2-10 Norham Road, Oxford OX2 6SE (http://www.mfo.cnrs.fr ), on 2 November, 6pm.

The event is organized as a collaboration between the BSHP and the MFO. All are welcome. Registration would be helpful, but is not mandatory. For contact and information, please write Mogens Laerke: secretary@bshp.org.uk.

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Hannah Farnham Lee – Philosophy and home economics

Yesterday members of the Wollstonecraft Philosophical Society found themselves at the house of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts in Boston. One of the Society members, Tom Paine, gave us an impromptu lecture on one of his ancestors who had lived in that house in the 19th Century.

Hannah Farnham Lee wrote about 20 books between 1830 and her death in 1865: novels, biographies, treatises.

A common theme in her novels was the strong, capable woman who rescued her family and community from financial ruin. She became famous for her book on home economics: Three Experiments in Living: living within the means, living up to the means and living beyond the means. (1837)

This was the first use of the term ‘experiment in living’ which was taken by John Stuart Mill in Chapter III of On Liberty (1859):

As it is useful that while mankind are imperfect there should be different opinions, so is it that there should be different experiments of living;

It is possible that the reference arose through Mill’s collaborator for On Liberty, Harriet Taylor Mill, who had a strong philosophical interest in women and economics.

Hannah Farnham Lee’s books can be found in electronic versions here.

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